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Complementary feeding and child appetitive traits in a sample of Hispanic mother-child dyads

  • Camille R. Schneider-Worthington
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Camille Schneider-Worthington, Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Medical Towers, MT-102C, 1720 2nd Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35294, , 205-975-7274.
    Affiliations
    Postdoctoral Fellow, Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Avenue South, MT-102C, Birmingham, Alabama 35294

    Assistant Professor, Department of Nutrition Sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Ave. S., MT-102C, Birmingham, Alabama 35294
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  • Marie Lauzon
    Affiliations
    Biostatistician II, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Research Center, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 8687 Melrose Ave, Office G-583, Los Angeles, California 90069
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  • Paige K. Berger
    Affiliations
    Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Pediatrics, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, University of Southern California, 4650 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, California 90027

    Investigator, Department of Pediatric Newborn Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis Street CWN-3, Boston, Massachusetts 02115
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  • Michael I. Goran
    Affiliations
    Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, University of Southern California, 4650 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, California 90027
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  • Sarah-Jeanne Salvy
    Affiliations
    Professor, Department of Medicine, Research Center for Health Equity, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 700 N. San Vicente Boulevard., West Hollywood, California 90069
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Published:November 11, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2022.11.005
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      Abstract

      Background

      Complementary feeding practices may contribute to toddler eating practices that affect weight outcomes. Studies are needed to understand the relationship between complementary feeding practices and toddler dietary self-regulation.

      Objective

      This study tests the hypothesis that earlier complementary food introduction predicts toddler food responsiveness and emotional overeating (i.e., tendency to overeat in response to food cues and emotions, respectively), and considers whether introduction of certain foods better predict toddler dietary self-regulation.

      Design

      This study is a secondary analysis of data from a parent longitudinal birth cohort study on early growth/development among Hispanic mother-infant dyads.

      Participants/setting

      The analytic sample included 174 mother-child dyads recruited from maternity clinics affiliated with the University of Southern California in Los Angeles County. Recruitment and data collection were ongoing from 7/2016 to 4/2020. At 1-, 6-, 12-, and 24-months postpartum, mothers reported exclusive breastfeeding duration and age of complementary food introduction via questionnaire.

      Main outcome measures

      Child food responsiveness and emotional overeating scores calculated from the Child Eating Behavior Questionnaire at 12- and 24-months of age.

      Statistical analyses performed

      Separate linear mixed models with repeated measures were used to examine associations between age of complementary food introduction as a predictor of child food responsiveness or emotional overeating, controlling for infant sex, birth body mass index z-score, duration of exclusive breastfeeding, and mother’s body mass index.

      Results

      In separate models, delaying complementary food introduction by 1-month was associated with a 6% reduction in food responsiveness (p=0.007) and a 5% reduction in emotional overeating scores (p=0.013). Fifty-eight unique combinations of complementary foods introduced first were found, precluding analyses to examine whether specific combinations were related to eating behavior outcomes due to sample size limitations.

      Conclusions

      Earlier complementary feeding was associated with higher food responsiveness and emotional overeating scores among Hispanic children. Future studies in larger samples are needed to characterize patterns of complementary food introduction and their influence on child self-regulation.

      Keywords

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