Advertisement

Feasibility of Cooking Matters for Diabetes: A 6-week Randomized, Controlled Cooking and Diabetes Self-Management Education Intervention

Published:August 05, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2022.07.020

      Abstract

      Background

      Diabetes self-management education and support is the cornerstone of diabetes care, yet <10% of adults with diabetes manage their condition successfully. Feasible interventions are needed urgently.

      Objective

      Our aim was to assess the feasibility of a cooking intervention with food provision and diabetes self-management education and support.

      Design

      This was a waitlist-controlled, randomized trial.

      Participants/setting

      Thirteen adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who participated in Cooking Matters for Diabetes (CMFD) participated in 2 focus groups.

      Intervention

      CMFD was adapted from Cooking Matters and the American Diabetes Association’s diabetes self-management education and support intervention into a 6-week program with weekly lesson–aligned food provisions.

      Main outcome measures

      Feasibility was evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively along the following 5 dimensions: demand, acceptability, implementation, practicality, and limited efficacy.

      Statistical analysis

      Two coders extracted focus group themes with 100% agreement after iterative analysis, resulting in consensus. Administrative data were analyzed via descriptive statistics.

      Results

      Mean (SD) age of focus group participants was 57 (14) years; 85% identified as female; 39% identified as White; 46% identified as Black; and income ranged from <$5,000 per year (15%) to $100,000 or more per year (15%). Mean (SD) baseline hemoglobin A1c was 8.6% (1.2%). Mean attendance in CMFD was 5 of 6 classes (83%) among all participants. Demand was high based on attendance and reported intervention utilization and was highest among food insecure participants, who were more likely to report using the food provisions and recipes. Acceptability was also high; focus groups revealed the quality of instructors and interaction with peers as key intervention strengths. Participant ideas for implementation refinement included simplifying recipes, lengthening class sessions, and offering more food provision choices. Perceived effects of the intervention included lower hemoglobin A1c and body weight and improvements to health-related quality of life.

      Conclusions

      The CMFD intervention was feasible according to the measured principles of demand, acceptability, implementation, practicality, and limited efficacy.

      Keywords

      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • Menke A.
        • Orchard T.J.
        • Imperatore G.
        • Bullard K.M.
        • Mayer-Davis E.
        • Cowie C.C.
        The prevalence of type 1 diabetes in the United States.
        Epidemiology. 2013; 24: 773-774
      1. National Diabetes Statistics Report 2020. Estimates of diabetes and its burden in the United States. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
        • American Diabetes Association
        5. Facilitating behavior change and well-being to improve health outcome.
        s: Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes—2020. Diabetes Care. 2020; 43: S48-S65
        • Powers M.A.
        • Bardsley J.
        • Cypress M.
        • et al.
        Diabetes self-management education and support in type 2 diabetes: A joint position statement of the American Diabetes Association, the American Association of Diabetes Educators, and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.
        Diabetes Care. 2015; 38: 1372-1382
        • Powers M.A.
        • Bardsley J.K.
        • Cypress M.
        • et al.
        Diabetes self-management education and support in adults with type 2 diabetes: A Consensus Report of the American Diabetes Association, the Association of Diabetes Care & Education Specialists, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Academy of PAs, the American Association of Nurse Practitioners, and the American Pharmacists Association.
        Sci Diabetes Self-Manag Care. 2021; 47: 54-73
        • Franz M.J.
        • MacLeod J.
        • Evert A.
        • et al.
        Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Nutrition Practice guideline for type 1 and type 2 diabetes in adults: Systematic review of evidence for medical nutrition therapy effectiveness and recommendations for integration into the nutrition care process.
        J Acad Nutr Diet. 2017; 117: 1659-1679
        • Briggs Early K.
        • Stanley K.
        Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: The role of medical nutrition therapy and registered dietitian nutritionists in the prevention and treatment of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes.
        J Acad Nutr Diet. 2018; 118: 343-353
        • Evert A.B.
        • Dennison M.
        • Gardner C.D.
        • et al.
        Nutrition therapy for adults with diabetes or prediabetes: A consensus report.
        Diabetes Care. 2019; 42: 731-754
        • Watts S.A.
        • Yelverton D.
        An expanded paradigm of primary care diabetes chronic disease management.
        J Nurse Pract. 2021; 17: 677-679
        • Andary R.
        • Fan W.
        • Wong N.D.
        Control of cardiovascular risk factors among US adults with type 2 diabetes with and without cardiovascular disease.
        Am J Cardiol. 2019; 124: 522-527
        • Berkowitz S.A.
        • Baggett T.P.
        • Wexler D.J.
        • Huskey K.W.
        • Wee C.C.
        Food insecurity and metabolic control among U.S. adults with diabetes.
        Diabetes Care. 2013; 36: 3093-3099
        • Seligman H.K.
        • Jacobs E.A.
        • López A.
        • Tschann J.
        • Fernandez A.
        Food insecurity and glycemic control among low-income patients with type 2 diabetes.
        Diabetes Care. 2012; 35: 233-238
      2. Definitions of food security. US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, Published 2019
        • Iacovou M.
        • Pattieson D.C.
        • Truby H.
        • Palermo C.
        Social health and nutrition impacts of community kitchens: A systematic review.
        Public Health Nutr. 2013; 16: 535-543
        • Soliah L.A.L.
        • Walter J.M.
        • Jones S.A.
        Benefits and barriers to healthful eating: What are the consequences of decreased food preparation ability?.
        Am J Lifestyle Med. 2012; 6: 152-158
        • Abbott P.
        • Davison J.
        • Moore L.
        • Rubinstein R.
        Barriers and enhancers to dietary behaviour change for Aboriginal people attending a diabetes cooking course.
        Health Promot J Austr. 2010; 21: 33-38
        • Archuleta M.
        • VanLeeuwen D.
        • Halderson K.
        • et al.
        Cooking schools improve nutrient intake patterns of people with type 2 diabetes.
        J Nutr Educ Behav. 2012; 44: 319-325
        • Byrne C.
        • Kurmas N.
        • Burant C.J.
        • et al.
        Cooking classes: A diabetes self-management support intervention enhancing clinical values.
        Diabetes Educ. 2017; 43: 600-607
        • Dasgupta K.
        • Hajna S.
        • Joseph L.
        • Da Costa D.
        • Christopoulos S.
        • Gougeon R.
        Effects of meal preparation training on body weight, glycemia, and blood pressure: Results of a phase 2 trial in type 2 diabetes.
        Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2012; 9: 125
        • Williams A.
        • Shrodes J.C.
        • Radabaugh J.N.
        • et al.
        Outcomes of Cooking Matters for Diabetes: A 6-week randomized, controlled cooking and diabetes self-management education intervention.
        J Acad Nutr Diet. 2022; 122 (00-00)
        • Beck J.
        • Greenwood D.A.
        • Blanton L.
        • et al.
        2017 National standards for diabetes self-management education and support.
        Diabetes Care. 2017; 40: 1409-1419
      3. American Diabetes Association’s Education Recognition Program Review Criteria and Indicators. 10th ed. American Diabetes Association, 2017
        • Bowen D.J.
        • Kreuter M.
        • Spring B.
        • et al.
        How we design feasibility studies.
        Am J Prev Med. 2009; 36: 452-457
        • Harris P.A.
        • Taylor R.
        • Thielke R.
        • et al.
        Research electronic data capture (REDCap)—A metadata-driven methodology and workflow process for providing translational research informatics support.
        J Biomed Inform. 2009; 42: 377-381
        • Harris P.A.
        • Taylor R.
        • Minor B.L.
        • et al.
        The REDCap consortium: Building an international community of software platform partners.
        J Biomed Inform. 2019; 95103208
      4. US Household Food Security Survey Module: Three-Stage Design, with Screeners. US Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, Published 2012
        https://www.ers.usda.gov/media/8271/hh2012.pdf
        Date accessed: October 12, 2021
      5. R: A Language and Environment for Statistical Computing [computer program]. R Foundation for Statistical Computing, 2021
        • Braun V.
        • Clarke V.
        Using thematic analysis in psychology.
        Qual Res Psychol. 2006; 3: 77-101
      6. Diet History Questionnaire III. National Cancer Institute.
        https://epi.grants.cancer.gov/dhq3/
        Date accessed: August 14, 2022
        • Lyles C.R.
        • Wolf M.S.
        • Schillinger D.
        • et al.
        Food insecurity in relation to changes in hemoglobin A1c, self-efficacy, and fruit/vegetable intake during a diabetes educational intervention.
        Diabetes Care. 2013; 36: 1448-1453
        • McGorrian C.
        • O’Hara M.C.
        • Reid V.
        • Minogue M.
        • Fitzpatrick P.
        • Kelleher C.
        BMI change in Australian cardiac rehabilitation patients: Cookery skills intervention versus written information.
        Health Promot Int. 2015; 30: 228-238
        • Poelman M.P.
        • de Vet E.
        • Velema E.
        • de Boer M.R.
        • Seidell J.C.
        • Steenhuis I.H.M.
        [email protected]: Results of a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effect of a multi-component portion size intervention on portion control behavior and body mass index.
        Ann Behav Med. 2015; 49: 18-28
        • Greenlee H.
        • Gaffney A.O.
        • Aycinena A.C.
        • et al.
        ¡Cocinar Para Su Salud!: Randomized controlled trial of a culturally based dietary intervention among Hispanic breast cancer survivors.
        J Acad Nutr Diet. 2015; 115: 709-723
        • Carmody J.
        • Olendzki B.
        • Reed G.
        • Andersen V.
        • Rosenzweig P.
        A dietary intervention for recurrent prostate cancer after definitive primary treatment: Results of a randomized pilot trial.
        Urology. 2008; 72: 1324-1328
        • Peters N.C.
        • Contento I.R.
        • Kronenberg F.
        • Coleton M.
        Adherence in a 1-year whole foods eating pattern intervention with healthy postmenopausal women.
        Public Health Nutr. 2014; 17: 2806-2815
        • Woods-Giscombe C.L.
        • Gaylord S.A.
        • Li Y.
        • et al.
        A mixed-methods, randomized clinical trial to examine feasibility of a mindfulness-based stress management and diabetes risk reduction intervention for African Americans with prediabetes.
        Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2019; 2019e3962623
        • Hu J.
        • Mion L.C.
        • Tan A.
        • et al.
        Perceptions of African American adults with type 2 diabetes on family support: Type, quality, and recommendations.
        Sci Diabetes Self-Manag Care. 2021; 47: 302-311
        • Abbott P.A.
        • Davison J.E.
        • Moore L.F.
        • Rubinstein R.
        Effective nutrition education for Aboriginal Australians: Lessons from a diabetes cooking course.
        J Nutr Educ Behav. 2012; 44: 55-59
        • MyPlate
        US Department of Agriculture.
        https://www.myplate.gov/
        Date accessed: August 11, 2022

      Biography

      J. C. Shrodes is a certified diabetes care and education specialist and staff dietitian, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus.

      Biography

      A. Williams is a postdoctoral scholar, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus.

      Biography

      T. S. Nolan is an assistant professor, The Ohio State University College of Nursing, Columbus.

      Biography

      J. N. Radabaugh is a graduate student, Division of Medical Dietetics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus.

      Biography

      A. Braun is an assistant professor, Department of Nutritional Sciences, School of Education and Human Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater; at the time of the study she was a postdoctoral scholar, Division of Medical Dietetics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus.

      Biography

      D. Kline is an assistant professor, Department of Biostatistics and Data Science, Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC.

      Biography

      S. Zhao is a biostatistician, Center for Biostatistics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus.

      Biography

      G. Brock is an associate professor, Department of Biomedical Informatics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus.

      Biography

      J. A. Garner is an assistant professor, The School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The Ohio State University College of Medicine and The John Glenn College of Public Affairs, The Ohio State University, Columbus.

      Biography

      C. K. Spees is an associate professor, Division of Medical Dietetics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus.

      Biography

      J. J. Joseph is an assistant professor, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus.

      Linked Article