Performance and Feasibility of Recalls Completed Using the Automated Self-Administered 24-Hour Dietary Assessment Tool in Relation to Other Self-Report Tools and Biomarkers in the Interactive Diet and Activity Tracking in AARP (IDATA) Study

Published:August 17, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2020.06.015

      Abstract

      Background

      Automated Self-Administered 24-Hour Dietary Assessment Tool (ASA24) is a self-administered web-based tool designed to collect detailed dietary data at low cost in observational studies.

      Objective

      The objectives of this study were to describe, overall and by demographic groups, the performance and feasibility of ASA24-2011 recalls and compare Healthy Eating Index-2015 (HEI-2015) total and component scores to 4-day food records (4DFRs) and food frequency questionnaires (FFQs).

      Design

      Over 12 months, participants completed up to 6 ASA24 recalls, 2 web-based FFQs, and 2 unweighed paper-and-pencil 4DFRs. Up to 3 attempts were made to obtain each ASA24 recall. Participants were administered doubly-labeled water to provide a measure of total energy expenditure and collected two 24-hour urine samples to assess concentrations of nitrogen, sodium, and potassium.

      Participants/setting

      From January through September 2012, 1,110 adult members of AARP, 50 to 74 years of age, were recruited from the Pittsburgh, PA, area to participate in the Interactive Diet and Activity Tracking in AARP (IDATA) study. After excluding 33 participants who had not completed any dietary assessments, 531 men and 546 women remained.

      Main outcome measures

      Response rates, nutrient intakes compared to recovery biomarkers across each ASA24 administration day, and HEI-2015 total and component scores were measured.

      Statistical analyses performed

      Means, medians, standard deviations, interquartile ranges, and HEI-2015 total and component scores computed using a multivariate measurement error model are presented.

      Results

      Ninety-one percent of men and 86% of women completed 3 ASA24 recalls. Approximately three-quarters completed 5 or more, higher than the completion rates for 2 4DFRs and 2 FFQs. Approximately, three-quarters of men and 70% of women completed ASA24 on the first attempt; 1 in 5 completed it on the second. Completion rates varied slightly by age and body mass index. Median time to complete ASA24-2011 (current version: ASA24-2020) declined with subsequent recalls from 55 to 41 minutes in men and from 58 to 42 minutes in women and was lowest in those younger than 60 years. Mean nutrient intakes were similar across recalls. For each recording day, energy intakes estimated by ASA24 were lower than energy expenditure. Reported intakes for protein, potassium, and sodium were closer to recovery biomarkers for women, but not for men. Geometric means of reported intakes of these nutrients did not systematically vary across ASA24 administrations, but differences between reported intakes and biomarkers differed by nutrient. Of 100 possible points, HEI-2015 total scores were nearly identical for 4DFRs and ASA24 recalls and higher for FFQs (men: 61, 60, and 68; women: 64, 64, and 72, respectively).

      Conclusions

      ASA24, a freely available dietary assessment tool for use in large-scale nutrition research, was found to be highly feasible. Similar to previously reported data for nutrient intakes, HEI-2015 total and component scores for ASA24 recalls were comparable to those for 4DFRs, but not FFQs.

      Trial registration

      Keywords

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      Biography

      A. F. Subar is a nutritionist and program director, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, Bethesda, MD.

      Biography

      F. E. Thompson is an epidemiologist and special volunteer, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, Bethesda, MD.

      Biography

      K. W. Dodd is mathematical statisticians, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD.

      Biography

      D. Midthune is mathematical statisticians, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD.

      Biography

      V. Kipnis is mathematical statisticians, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD.

      Biography

      H. R. Bowles is an epidemiologist, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD.

      Biography

      N. Potischman is director, Population Studies Program, Office of Dietary Supplements, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.

      Biography

      D. J. Baer is a research physiologist, US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD.

      Biography

      D. A. Schoeller is director, Isotope Ratio Core, Biotech Center and Nutritional Sciences, Universtiy of Wisconsin, Madison.

      Biography

      S. I. Kirkpatrick is a nutritionist and associate professor, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.

      Biography

      B. Mittl is a project director, is nutritionists, Westat, Rockville, MD.

      Biography

      T. P. Zimmerman is nutritionists, Westat, Rockville, MD.

      Biography

      D. Douglass is nutritionists, Westat, Rockville, MD.

      Biography

      Y. Park is an epidemiologist and associate professor, Division of Public Health Sciences, Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO.