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Policy Recommendations to Address Energy Drink Marketing and Consumption by Vulnerable Populations in the United States

Published:March 20, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2020.01.013
      This commentary defines energy drink products, describes the marketing strategies used to promote these products, and explores the potential safety, health risks, and prevalence related to their use. It also discusses actions taken by government and other stakeholders to address energy drink marketing to vulnerable populations in the United States, and explores US progress to implement recommended actions between 2009 and 2019. Vulnerable populations are defined as individuals or groups who are at higher risk of dietary and health disparities due to economic disadvantage, age, gender, race or ethnicity, cultural identity, or common risk behaviors.

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      Biography

      V. I. Kraak is an assistant professor, Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA.

      Biography

      B. M. Davy is a professor, Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA.

      Biography

      M. S. Rockwell is an instructor, Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA.

      Biography

      S. Kostelnik is a doctoral student, Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA.

      Biography

      V. E. Hedrick is an assistant professor, Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA.