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Documented Success and Future Potential of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act

Published:January 13, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2019.10.021
      The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act (HHFKA) of 2010 required the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) to create updated school meal and competitive food standards that aligned with the concurrent (2010) version of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

      Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. Pub L No. 111-296, 124 Stat 3183.

      The resulting regulations significantly strengthened the nutrition standards for school breakfast and lunch,

      US Department of Agriculture. Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs: Final rule. 77 Federal Register 4088-4167. 2012. Codified at 7 CFR §210.0.

      and introduced new nutrition standards for foods sold outside of the school meal program during the school day (ie, Smart Snacks in School).

      US Department of Agriculture, National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program: Nutrition Standards for All Foods Sold in School as Required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, 81 Federal Register 50131. 2016. Codifed at 7 CFR §210.11.

      Further, the USDA articulated new expectations for local school wellness policies such as limiting student exposure to unhealthy food marketing and increasing district accountability for policy implementation and progress toward goals.

      US Department of Agriculture. Local School Wellness Policy Implementation Under the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010: Final rule. 81 Federal Register 50151. 2016. Codifed at 7 CFR §210.31.

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      References

      1. Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. Pub L No. 111-296, 124 Stat 3183.

      2. US Department of Agriculture. Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs: Final rule. 77 Federal Register 4088-4167. 2012. Codified at 7 CFR §210.0.

      3. US Department of Agriculture, National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program: Nutrition Standards for All Foods Sold in School as Required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, 81 Federal Register 50131. 2016. Codifed at 7 CFR §210.11.

      4. US Department of Agriculture. Local School Wellness Policy Implementation Under the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010: Final rule. 81 Federal Register 50151. 2016. Codifed at 7 CFR §210.31.

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      Biography

      J. Cohen is an assistant professor, Department of Public Health and Nutrition, School of Health Sciences, Merrimack College, North Andover, MA, and an adjunct assistant professor, Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H.Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.

      Biography

      M. B. Schwartz is a professor, Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, Department of Human Development and Family Sciences, University of Connecticut, Hartford, CT.

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