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Evaluating the Validity of a Food Frequency Questionnaire in Comparison with a 7-Day Dietary Record for Measuring Dietary Intake in a Population of Survivors of Colorectal Cancer

Published:December 03, 2019DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2019.09.008

      Abstract

      Background

      Food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) are a commonly used method to assess dietary intake in epidemiological studies. It is important to evaluate the validity of FFQs in the population of interest.

      Objective

      To evaluate the validity of an FFQ for measuring dietary intake in survivors of colorectal cancer (CRC), relative to a 7-day dietary record.

      Design

      Dietary intake was assessed 1 year after the end of CRC treatment. Participants first completed a 7-day dietary record and 2 weeks later a 253-item FFQ that measured intake in the preceding month.

      Participants/setting

      Data were used from a subsample of participants (n=100) enrolled in an ongoing prospective study (EnCoRe study) in the Netherlands, from 2015 to 2018.

      Main outcome measures

      Estimated intakes of total energy, 19 nutrients, and 20 food groups as well as scoring adherence to the dietary recommendations of the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) were compared between both dietary assessment methods.

      Statistical analyses performed

      Means and standard deviations, Spearman rank correlations corrected for within-person variation and total energy, and κ agreement between quintiles were assessed.

      Results

      The median Spearman correlation corrected for within-person variation for nutrients and total energy was 0.60. Correlations >0.50 were found for 15 of 19 nutrients, with highest agreement for vitamin B-12 (0.74), polysaccharides (0.75), and alcohol (0.91). On average, 73% (range=60% to 84%) of participants were classified into the exact same or adjacent nutrient quintile. The median Spearman correlation corrected for within-person variation for food groups was 0.62. Correlations >0.50 were found for 17 of 20 food groups, with highest agreement for cereals and cereal products (0.96), fish (0.96), and potatoes (0.99). The Spearman correlation between total scores of the WCRF/AICR dietary recommendations was 0.53.

      Conclusions

      Relative to a 7-day dietary record, the validity of an FFQ for measuring dietary intake among survivors of CRC appeared moderate to good for most nutrients and food groups.

      Keywords

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      Biography

      J. L. Koole is a PhD candidate, Department of Epidemiology, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands.

      Biography

      M. J. L. Bours is an assistant professor, Department of Epidemiology, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands.

      Biography

      J. J. L. Breedveld-Peters is a scientist/dietitian, Department of Epidemiology, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands.

      Biography

      E. H. van Roekel is an assistant professor, Department of Epidemiology, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands.

      Biography

      M. P. Weijenberg is a professor, Department of Epidemiology, GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands.

      Biography

      M. C. J. M. van Dongen is an associate professor, Department of Epidemiology, CAPHRI Care and Public Health Research Institute, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands.

      Biography

      S. J. P. M. Eussen is an assistant professor, Department of Epidemiology, CARIM School for Cardiovascular Diseases, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands.

      Biography

      M. van Zutphen is a PhD candidate, Division of Human Nutrition and Health, Wageningen University & Research, Wageningen, the Netherlands.

      Biography

      F. J. B. van Duijnhoven is an assistant professor, Division of Human Nutrition and Health, Wageningen University & Research, Wageningen, the Netherlands.

      Biography

      H. C. Boshuizen is a professor, Division of Human Nutrition and Health, Wageningen University & Research, Wageningen, the Netherlands, and the Department Statistics, Informatics and Mathematical Modelling, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands.