Correlations between Fruit, Vegetables, Fish, Vitamins, and Fatty Acids Estimated by Web-Based Nonconsecutive Dietary Records and Respective Biomarkers of Nutritional Status

Published:October 27, 2015DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2015.09.017

      Abstract

      Background

      It is of major importance to measure the validity of self-reported dietary intake using web-based instruments before applying them in large-scale studies.

      Objective

      This study aimed to validate self-reported intake of fish, fruit and vegetables, and selected micronutrient intakes assessed by a web-based self-administered dietary record tool used in the NutriNet-Santé prospective cohort study, against the following concentration biomarkers: plasma beta carotene, vitamin C, and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

      Participants/setting

      One hundred ninety-eight adult volunteers (103 men and 95 women, mean age=50.5 years) were included in the protocol: they completed 3 nonconsecutive-day dietary records and two blood samples were drawn 3 weeks apart. The study was conducted in the area of Paris, France, between October 2012 and May 2013.

      Main outcome measures

      Reported fish, fruit and vegetables, and selected micronutrient intakes and plasma beta carotene, vitamin C, and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid levels were compared.

      Statistical analyses

      Simple and adjusted Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients were estimated after de-attenuation for intra-individual variation.

      Results

      Regarding food groups in men, adjusted correlations ranged from 0.20 for vegetables and plasma vitamin C to 0.49 for fruits and plasma vitamin C, and from 0.40 for fish and plasma c20:5 n-3 (eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA]) to 0.55 for fish and plasma c22:6 n-3 (docosahexaenoic acid). In women, correlations ranged from 0.13 (nonsignificant) for vegetables and plasma vitamin C to 0.41 for fruits and vegetables and plasma beta carotene, and from 0.27 for fatty fish and EPA to 0.54 for fish and EPA+docosahexaenoic acid. Regarding micronutrients, adjusted correlations ranged from 0.36 (EPA) to 0.58 (vitamin C) in men and from 0.32 (vitamin C) to 0.38 (EPA) in women.

      Conclusions

      The findings suggest that three nonconsecutive web-based dietary records provide reasonable estimates of true intake of fruits, vegetables, fish, beta carotene, vitamin C, and n-3 fatty acids. Along with other validation studies, this study shows acceptable validity of using such diet-assessment methods in large epidemiologic surveys and broadens new perspectives for epidemiology.

      Keywords

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      Biography

      C. Lassale is a nutritional epidemiology research team member, Research Center in Epidemiology and Biostatistics Sorbonne Paris Cité, Inserm U1153, Bobigny, France.

      Biography

      G. M. Camilleri is a nutritional epidemiology research team member, Research Center in Epidemiology and Biostatistics Sorbonne Paris Cité, Inserm U1153, Bobigny, France.

      Biography

      P. Galan is a nutritional epidemiology research team member, Research Center in Epidemiology and Biostatistics Sorbonne Paris Cité, Inserm U1153, Bobigny, France.

      Biography

      E. Kesse-Guyot is a nutritional epidemiology research team member, Research Center in Epidemiology and Biostatistics Sorbonne Paris Cité, Inserm U1153, Bobigny, France.

      Biography

      K. Castetbon is director, Nutrition Surveillance and Epidemiology Unit, University Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Bobigny, France, and director, Nutrition Surveillance and Epidemiology Unit, French Institute for Health Surveillance, Saint Maurice, France.

      Biography

      F. Laporte is a researcher, Department of Biochemistry, University Hospital of Grenoble, Grenoble, France.

      Biography

      V. Deschamps is an epidemiologist, Nutrition Surveillance and Epidemiology Unit, University Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Bobigny, France, and an epidemiologist, Nutrition Surveillance and Epidemiology Unit, French Institute for Health Surveillance, Saint Maurice, France.

      Biography

      M. Vernay is an epidemiologist, Nutrition Surveillance and Epidemiology Unit, University Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Bobigny, France, and an epidemiologist, Nutrition Surveillance and Epidemiology Unit, French Institute for Health Surveillance, Saint Maurice, France.

      Biography

      P. Faure is head, Department of Biochemistry, University Hospital of Grenoble, and head, HP2 Laboratory, University Grenoble Alpes, HP2 Laboratory, France.

      Biography

      S. Hercberg is the nutritional epidemiology research team director, Research Center in Epidemiology and Biostatistics Sorbonne Paris Cité, Inserm U1153, Bobigny, France, and nutrition professor and practitioner, Public Health Department, Avicenne Hospital, Bobigny, France.