The National Cancer Institute’s Dietary Assessment Primer: A Resource for Diet Research

Published:October 01, 2015DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2015.08.016

      Abstract

      This monograph describes the National Cancer Institute’s Dietary Assessment Primer, a web resource developed to help researchers choose the best available dietary assessment approach to achieve their research objective. All self-report instruments have error, but understanding the nature of that error can lead to better assessment, analysis, and interpretation of results. The Primer includes profiles of the major self-report dietary assessment instruments, including guidance on the best uses of each instrument; discussion of validation and measurement error generally and with respect to each instrument; guidance for choosing a dietary assessment approach for different research questions; and additional resources, such as a glossary, references, and overviews of specific/important issues in the field. This monograph also describes some future research needs in the field of dietary assessment.

      Keywords

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      Biography

      F. E. Thompson is a program director, Risk Factor Assessment Branch, Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.

      Biography

      A. F. Subar is a program director, Risk Factor Assessment Branch, Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.

      Biography

      J. Reedy is a program director, Risk Factor Assessment Branch, Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.

      Biography

      M. M. Wilson is a research associate, Risk Factor Assessment Branch, Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.

      Biography

      S. M. Krebs-Smith is acting chief, Risk Factor Assessment Branch, Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.

      Biography

      S. I. Kirkpatrick is an assistant professor, School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.

      Biography

      T. E. Schap is lead nutritionist, Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, US Department of Agriculture, Alexandria, VA; at the time of the study, she was a cancer prevention fellow, Risk Factor Assessment Branch, Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.