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The Automated Self-Administered 24-Hour Dietary Recall for Children, 2012 Version, for Youth Aged 9 to 11 Years: A Validation Study

Published:April 14, 2015DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2015.02.021

      Abstract

      Background

      Valid methods of diet assessment are important for nutrition research and practice, but can be difficult with children.

      Objective

      To validate the 2012 version of the Automated Self-Administered 24-Hour Dietary Recall for Children (ASA24-Kids-2012), a self-administered web-based 24-hour dietary recall (24hDR) instrument, among children aged 9 to 11 years, in two sites.

      Design

      Quasiexperimental.

      Participants/setting

      In one site, trained staff members observed and recorded foods and drinks consumed by children (n=38) during school lunch. The next day, the observed children completed both ASA24-Kids-2012 and an interviewer-administered 24hDR in a randomized order. Procedures in a second site (n=31) were similar, except observations occurred during dinner in a community location.

      Statistical analyses

      Foods were classified as matches (reported and consumed), intrusions (reported, but not consumed), or omissions (not reported, but consumed) for each participant. Rates of matches, intrusions, and omissions were calculated. Rates were compared between each recall method using repeated measures analysis of covariance. For matched foods, the authors determined correlation coefficients between observed and reported serving sizes.

      Results

      Match, intrusion, and omission rates between ASA24-Kids-2012 and observed intakes in Site 1 were 37%, 27%, and 35%, respectively. Comparable rates for interviewer-administered 24hDRs were 57%, 20%, and 23%, respectively. In Site 2, match, intrusion, and omission rates between ASA24-Kids-2012 and observed intakes were 53%, 12%, and 36%, respectively, vs 76% matches, 9% intrusions, and 15% omissions for interviewer-administered 24hDRs. The relationship strength between reported and observed serving sizes for matched foods was 0.18 in Site 1 and 0.09 in Site 2 for ASA24-Kids-2012, and 0.46 in Site 1 and 0.11 in Site 2 for interviewer-administered 24hDRs.

      Conclusions

      ASA24-Kids-2012 was less accurate than interviewer-administered 24hDRs when compared with observed intakes, but both performed poorly. Additional research should assess the age at which children can complete recalls without the help of a parent or guardian, as well as elucidate under which circumstances recalls can reasonably be used among children.

      Keywords

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      Biography

      C. S. Diep is a postdoctoral fellow, US Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service, Children’s Nutrition Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.

      Biography

      T.-A. Chen is a senior biostatistician, US Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service, Children’s Nutrition Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.

      Biography

      H. R. Dadabhoy is a research dietitian, US Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service, Children’s Nutrition Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.

      Biography

      A. Beltran is a senior research coordinator, US Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service, Children’s Nutrition Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.

      Biography

      J. Baranowski is an assistant professor, US Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service, Children’s Nutrition Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.

      Biography

      T. Baranowski is a professor, US Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service, Children’s Nutrition Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.

      Biography

      M. Hingle is an assistant professor, Department of Nutritional Sciences, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson.

      Biography

      A. F. Subar is a research nutritionist, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD.