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Advancing Health through Sustained Collaboration: How the History of Corporate Relations Extended the Academy’s Reach

Published:December 19, 2014DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2014.10.024
      Editor's Note: This is the fifth article in a series on the Academy's history from 1990 to the present. Other articles in the series are available at www.andjrnl.org/content/amh.When the concept of corporate alliances
      Academy’s Alliance Program consists of consortium, project, and social network relationships with organizations to advance the Academy's strategic plan. Sponsorship, on the other hand, represents when a company, that aligns with the vision and mission of the Academy, pays a fee to the Academy in return for specific rights and benefits that are equitable and clearly defined.
      Academy’s Alliance Program consists of consortium, project, and social network relationships with organizations to advance the Academy's strategic plan. Sponsorship, on the other hand, represents when a company, that aligns with the vision and mission of the Academy, pays a fee to the Academy in return for specific rights and benefits that are equitable and clearly defined.
      —pairing up profit-motivated corporations with cause-motivated associations—was introduced in the 1980s, it was at first considered an unlikely and uncomfortable union.
      The Academy closely evaluates all potential sponsorships to ensure that they are consistent with the Academy’s science-based positions and messages. The Academy does not endorse any companies, products or services. Sponsors do not influence the Academy’s decision making process nor do they affect policy positions.
      The Academy closely evaluates all potential sponsorships to ensure that they are consistent with the Academy’s science-based positions and messages. The Academy does not endorse any companies, products or services. Sponsors do not influence the Academy’s decision making process nor do they affect policy positions.
      But as this arrangement became more widely accepted as the new reality for nonprofit and for-profit business models, there was some reticence among the associations dedicated to practice in health and wellness. Could concern for the well-being of others assumed in practitioners of science and the profit motivation assumed of corporations align toward a goal that benefits each entity as well as the public at large?
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