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Database and Quick Methods of Assessing Typical Dietary Fiber Intakes using data for 228 Commonly Consumed Foods

  • JUDITH A MARLETT
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Judith A. Marlett, PhD, RD, Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Linden Dr, Madison, WI 53706-1571.
    Affiliations
    J. A. Marlett is a professor in the Department of Nutritional Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA
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  • TSUI-FUN CHEUNG
    Affiliations
    T-F. Cheung works in Kowloon, Hong Kong, but was at the University of Wisconsin-Madison at the time of the study, USA
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      Abstract

      To promote assessment of dietary fiber intakes in clinical settings, we established two objectives for this study: to provide a detailed database in grams per serving of fiber content and polymer composition for most fiber sources in the US diet, and to develop a quick method for estimating total fiber intakes. Data for 342 foods were condensed to 228 foods by combining similar foods. The comprehensive database developed includes pectin, hemicelluloses, and β-glucan contents of the soluble and insoluble fractions of fiber and the cellulose and Klason lignin contents of the insoluble fiber. Three fourths of the 228 foods contained 2.0 g fiber per serving or less; only 10% contained more than 3.0 g per serving. The quick method consists of multiplying the number of servings in each food group by the mean total dietary fiber content of foods in that group: 1.5 g for fruits (n=43), 1.5 g for vegetables (n=68), 1.0 g for refined grains (n=80), and 2.5 g for whole grains (n=13). Actual fiber values from the database should be used in the quick method if foodstuffs concentrated from grains, legumes, and nuts and seeds are consumed. Sample menus demonstrate that quick assessment of total fiber intake yielded results similar to the sum of individual values from the database. J Am Diet Assoc. 1997;97:1139–1148, 1151.
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