Advertisement

Taste, Temperature, and Presentation Predict Satisfaction with Foodservices in a Canadian Continuing-Care Hospital

  • PATRICIA A. O'HARA
    Affiliations
    D. W. Harper (corresponding author), P. A. O'Hara, M. Kangas, J. Dubeau, C. Borsutzky, and N. Lemire are with Sisters of Charity Ottawa Hospital, Saint-Vincent Pavilion, 60 Cambridge St N, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1R 7A5, Canada.
    Search for articles by this author
  • DAN W. HARPER
    Affiliations
    D. W. Harper (corresponding author), P. A. O'Hara, M. Kangas, J. Dubeau, C. Borsutzky, and N. Lemire are with Sisters of Charity Ottawa Hospital, Saint-Vincent Pavilion, 60 Cambridge St N, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1R 7A5, Canada.
    Search for articles by this author
  • MARIS KANGAS
    Affiliations
    D. W. Harper (corresponding author), P. A. O'Hara, M. Kangas, J. Dubeau, C. Borsutzky, and N. Lemire are with Sisters of Charity Ottawa Hospital, Saint-Vincent Pavilion, 60 Cambridge St N, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1R 7A5, Canada.
    Search for articles by this author
  • JANET DUBEAU
    Affiliations
    D. W. Harper (corresponding author), P. A. O'Hara, M. Kangas, J. Dubeau, C. Borsutzky, and N. Lemire are with Sisters of Charity Ottawa Hospital, Saint-Vincent Pavilion, 60 Cambridge St N, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1R 7A5, Canada.
    Search for articles by this author
  • CAROLINE BORSUTZKY
    Affiliations
    D. W. Harper (corresponding author), P. A. O'Hara, M. Kangas, J. Dubeau, C. Borsutzky, and N. Lemire are with Sisters of Charity Ottawa Hospital, Saint-Vincent Pavilion, 60 Cambridge St N, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1R 7A5, Canada.
    Search for articles by this author
  • NICOLE LEMIRE
    Affiliations
    D. W. Harper (corresponding author), P. A. O'Hara, M. Kangas, J. Dubeau, C. Borsutzky, and N. Lemire are with Sisters of Charity Ottawa Hospital, Saint-Vincent Pavilion, 60 Cambridge St N, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1R 7A5, Canada.
    Search for articles by this author

      Abstract

      Objective To identify food, service, and patient variables associated with high satisfaction with foodservices in a continuing-care hospital that serves, primarily, geriatric patients and patients undergoing physical rehabilitation.
      Design Survey questionnaire concerning eight aspects of food and foodservice as well as type of diet and major patient descriptors.
      Subjects All patients from geriatric continuing-care units, geriatric rehabilitation units, and physical rehabilitation units at Saint-Vincent Pavilion were considered potential respondents. A convenience sample of 65 clients met the established inclusion criteria and were willing to participate. Patients had to be able to communicate their views, and the clinical nursing staff judged all respondents to be cognitively able to provide opinions concerning food and foodservice. The mean age of subjects was 67 years, the mean length of stay in the hospital was 2 years, and 60% of the subjects were women (n=39).
      Statistical analyses Spearman rank correlations, univariate analyses (t tests for continuously distributed data, χ2 tests for categorical data), and multivariate analyses (regular and logistic regression).
      Results In general, patients questioned were extremely positive about the quality and quantity of food and food-services at this continuing-care/rehabilitation hospital. Type of diet and patient characteristics were not differentially associated with high levels of overall satisfaction with foodservices (as assessed by a general satisfaction question). Univariate analyses revealed that all aspects of foodservices (except quantity of food) were significantly correlated with overall satisfaction. Multivariate analyses showed that satisfaction with presentation of meal was the best predictor of overall satisfaction and that clients who were very satisfied with the taste of food and were very satisfied that cold food was cold enough were the most satisfied overall. Knowledge of key variables as assessed by multivariate analyses (ie, taste and coldness) predicted whether clients were very satisfied overall 80% of the time.
      Applications Surveys are useful tools for assessing the ways in which clients view the food and services provided by dietitians. Dietitians in continuing-care settings need to focus on a few specific characteristics related to what is eaten and how food is presented, rather than on patient-specific variables, when trying to maximize satisfaction with hospital food. The information in this study can be used as a baseline against which future data can be compared. The survey contributes to a continuing quality assurance process that allows dietitians to track the effect of changes that are made to food and foodservices and to monitor areas that require modification. J Am Diet Assoc. 1997;97:401–405.
      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

      1. Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations Using patient input in a cycle for performance improvement.
        J Quality Improvement. 1995; 21: 87-96
        • Ferris L.E.
        • Williams J.I.
        • Llewellyn-Thomas H.A.
        • Basinski A.S.H.
        • Cohen M.M.
        • Naylor C.D.
        A guide to direct measures of patient satisfaction in clinical practice.
        Can Med Assoc J. 1992; 146: 1727-1731
      2. Nelson EC, Larson C. Patients' good and bad surprises: how do they relate to overall patient satisfaction? Quality Rev Bull. March 1993:89–94.

        • Fitzpatrick B.
        • Taylor R.
        Patients' criteria in assessing quality.
        Nurs Stand. 1994; 8: 34-39
        • Dubé L.
        • Trudeau E.
        • Bélanger M-.C.
        Determining the complexity of patient satisfaction with foodservices.
        J Am Diet Assoc. 1994; 94: 394-401
        • Maller O.
        • Dubose C.N.
        • Cardello A.V.
        Consumer opinions of hospital food and foodservice.
        J Am Diet Assoc. 1980; 76: 236-242
        • Schwartz N.E.
        Development of a scale to measure client satisfaction with ambulatory nutritional care.
        J Can Diet Assoc. 1988; 49: 163-168
        • DeLuco D.
        • Cremer M.
        Consumers' perceptions of hospital food and dietary services.
        J Am Diet Assoc. 1990; 90: 1711-1715
        • Johnston C.M.
        • Upton E.M.
        Managers' perceptions of customers' satisfactions with their hospital cafeteria services.
        J Can Diet Assoc. 1991; 52: 11-14
        • Gregoire M.B.
        Quality of patient meal service in hospitals.
        J Am Diet Assoc. 1994; 94: 1129-1134
        • Trudeau E.
        • Dubé L.
        Moderators and determinants of satisfaction with diet counseling for patients consuming a therapeutic diet.
        J Am Diet Assoc. 1995; 95: 34-39
        • Bélanger M.C.
        • Dubé L.
        The emotional experience of hospitalization.
        J Am Diet Assoc. 1996; 96: 354-360