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Increased Iron Content of Some Indian Foods Due to Cookware

  • USHA K. KOLLIPARA
    Affiliations
    Usha K. Kollipara MS is a graduate assistant, Helen C. Brittin PhD RD is a professor in food and nutrition in the College of Human Sciences, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Tex, USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • HELEN C. BRITTIN
    Correspondence
    Address Corresponding Helen C. Brittin, PhD, RD, College of Human Sciences, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409.
    Affiliations
    Usha K. Kollipara MS is a graduate assistant, Helen C. Brittin PhD RD is a professor in food and nutrition in the College of Human Sciences, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Tex, USA
    Search for articles by this author
      Iron deficiency is widespread throughout the world (
      • Scrimshaw N.S.
      Iron deficiency.
      ), including the United States (
      • Anderson R.A.
      • Bryden N.A.
      • Polansky M.M.
      Dietary intake of calcium, chromium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, and zinc duplicate plate values corrected using derived nutrient intake.
      ,
      • Wiecha J.L.
      • Dwyer J.T.
      • Jacques P.F.
      • Wand W.M.
      Nutritional and economic advantages for homeless families in shelters providing kitchen facilities and food.
      ,
      • Zive M.M.
      • Tara H.L.
      • Broyles S.L.
      • Frank-Spohrer G.C.
      • Nader P.R.
      Vitamin and mineral intakes of Anglo-American and Mexican-American preschoolers.
      ,
      • Dollahite J.
      • Franklin D.
      • McNew R.
      Problems encountered in meeting the Recommended Dietary Allowances for menus designed according to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.
      ), India (
      • Venkatachalam P.S.
      Iron metabolism and iron deficiency in India.
      ), and in Indians living in Western countries (
      • Bindra G.S.
      • Gibson R.S.
      Iron status of predominantly lacto-ovo vegetarian East Indian immigrants to Canada a model approach.
      ,
      • MacPhail A.P.
      • Bothwell T.H.
      • Torrance J.D.
      Iron nutrition in Indian women at different ages.
      ). It is caused mainly by inadequate intake and poor availability of iron in food (
      • Cook J.D.
      Absorption of food iron.
      ). Prevention is important because iron deficiency can irreversibly damage brain function and impair the immune system (
      • Scrimshaw N.S.
      Iron deficiency.
      ). Research has raised concern about high iron stores relative to heart attacks (
      • Salonen J.T.
      • Nyyssonen K.
      • Korpela H.
      • Taomilehto J.
      • Seppanen R.
      • Salonen R.
      High stored iron levels are associated with excess risk of myocardial infarction in Eastern Finnish men.
      ) and colon cancer (
      • Nelson R.L.
      • Davis F.G.
      • Sutter E.
      • Sobin L.H.
      • Kikendall J.W.
      • Bowen P.
      Body iron stores and risk of colonic neoplasia.
      ), although one study found an inverse association of iron stores with overall mortality and mortality from cardiovascular causes (
      • Sempos C.T.
      • Looker A.C.
      • Gillum R.F.
      • Makuc D.M.
      Body iron stores and the risk of coronary heart disease.
      ). Measuring iron status is recommended because an estimated 6% of Americans have negative iron balance and 1% have iron overload (
      • Herbert V.
      Everyone should be tested for iron disorders.
      ).
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