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Playing with Food: Promoting Food Play to Teach Healthful Eating Habits

      Integral to the role-playing games of domestic life that are a rite of passage to so many young children is food play—the pretend shopping for, preparing, and serving of food-shaped toys composed of wood, hard plastic, felt, or plush materials. Though such toys are primarily designed and marketed for children’s play at home and at school, there may be a great opportunity in using these pretend foods as learning tools—food and nutrition professionals who work with young children might benefit from digging into the toybox.
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