Advertisement

Changing the Energy Density of the Diet as a Strategy for Weight Management

      Abstract

      A growing body of laboratory-based, clinical, and epidemiological data suggests that low-energy-dense diets are associated with better diet quality, lower energy intakes, and body weight. Dietary energy density can be lowered by adding water-rich fruits, vegetables, cooked grains, and soups to the diet, and by reducing the diet’s fat content. Low-energy-dense diets can be successfully incorporated into clinical dietetics since they help lower energy intake without reducing food volume and thus help individuals avoid feeling hungry and deprived. There are multiple steps that could be taken by nutrition professionals and food manufacturers to encourage the consumption of low-energy-dense diets. The goal is to develop reduced-calorie eating plans that meet personal food preferences and also provide satisfying food portions. Since using energy density to guide food choices leads to food patterns consistent with dietary guidelines, policy level initiatives should be devised to help ensure that low-energy-dense diets are affordable and accessible to all.
      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • Rolls B.J.
        • Bell E.A.
        Dietary approaches to the treatment of obesity.
        in: Jensen M.D. March 2000. Medical Clinics of North America. Volume 84. W.B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia, PA2000: 401-418
        • Yao M.
        • Roberts S.B.
        Dietary energy density and weight regulation.
        Nutr Rev. 2001; 59: 247-258
        • Poppitt S.D.
        • Prentice A.M.
        Energy density and its role in the control of food intake.
        Appetite. 1996; 26: 153-174
        • Kral T.V.
        • Rolls B.J.
        Energy density and portion size.
        Physiol Behav. 2004; 82: 131-138
        • World Health Organization
        Diet, Nutrition and the Prevention of Chronic Diseases. World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland2003 (WHO Technical Report Series, No. 916)
        • Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee
        Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005. US Department of Health and Human Services, US Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC2005
        • Drewnowski A.
        Fat and sugar.
        J Nutr. 2003; 133: S838-S840
        • Drewnowski A.
        • Specter S.E.
        Poverty and obesity.
        Am J Clin Nutr. 2004; 79: 6-16
        • Darmon N.
        • Briend A.
        • Drewnowski A.
        Energy-dense diets are associated with lower diet costs.
        Public Health Nutr. 2004; 7: 21-27
        • Bell E.A.
        • Castellanos V.H.
        • Pelkman C.L.
        • Thorwart M.L.
        • Rolls B.J.
        Energy density of foods affects energy intake in normal-weight women.
        Am J Clin Nutr. 1998; 67: 412-420
        • Rolls B.J.
        • Roe L.S.
        • Meengs J.S.
        Salad and satiety.
        J Am Diet Assoc. 2004; 104: 1570-1576
        • Drewnowski A.
        • Almiron-Roig E.
        • Marmonier C.
        • Lluch A.
        Dietary energy density and body weight.
        Nutr Rev. 2004; 62: 403-413
        • National Institutes of Health
        Clinical Guidelines on the Identification, Evaluation, and Treatment of Overweight and Obesity in Adults. 1998 (NIH Publication No. 98-4083 ed. Bethesda, MD: Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute)
        • Rolls B.J.
        • Roe L.S.
        • Beach A.M.
        • Kris-Etherton P.M.
        Daily consumption of a low-energy-dense food enhances long-term weight loss.
        Obes Res. 2004; 12: A55
        • Ello-Martin J.A.
        • Roe L.S.
        • Rolls B.J.
        A diet reduced in energy density results in greater weight loss than a diet reduced in fat.
        Obes Res. 2004; 12: A23
        • Rolls B.J.
        • Ello-Martin J.A.
        • Tohill B.C.
        What can intervention studies tell us about the relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and weight management?.
        Nutr Rev. 2004; 62: 1-17
        • Ledikwe J.H.
        • Blanck H.M.
        • Kettel-Khan L.
        • Serdula M.K.
        • Seymour J.
        • Tohill B.C.
        • Rolls B.J.
        Dietary energy density determined by eight calculation methods in a nationally representative United States population.
        J Nutr. 2004; 135: 273-278
        • Ledikwe J.H.
        • Blanck H.M.
        • Kettel-Khan L.
        • Serdula M.K.
        • Seymour J.
        • Tohill B.C.
        • Rolls B.J.
        Eating patterns and weight status associated with a low-energy- dense diet in US adults.
        Obes Res. 2004; 12: A211
        • Ledikwe J.H.
        • Blanck H.M.
        • Kettel-Khan L.
        • Serdula M.K.
        • Seymour J.
        • Tohill B.C.
        • Rolls B.J.
        Dietary energy density is associated with quality of diet in US adults.
        FASEB J. 2005; 18: 570.6
        • Rolls B.
        • Barnett R.A.
        The Volumetrics Weight-Control Plan. HarperTorch, New York, NY2003
        • Rolls B.
        The Volumetrics Eating Plan. HarperCollins Publishers, Inc, New York, NY2005
        • Drewnowski A.
        Energy density, palatability, and satiety.
        Nutr Rev. 1998; 56: 347-353
        • Klein S.
        • Sheard N.F.
        • Pi-Sunyer X.
        • Daly A.
        • Wylie-Rosett J.
        • Kulkarni K.
        • Clark N.G.
        Weight management through lifestyle modification for the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes.
        A statement of the American Diabetes Association, the North American Association for the Study of Obesity, and the American Society for Clinical Nutrition. Am J Clin Nutr. 2004; 80: 257-263
        • McCarthy M.
        The economics of obesity.
        Lancet. 2004; 364: 2169-2170
        • Rolls B.J.
        The supersizing of America.
        Nutr Today. 2003; 38: 42-53
        • Seymour J.D.
        • Fenley M.A.
        • Yaroch A.L.
        • Khan L.K.
        • Serdula M.
        Fruit and vegetable environment, policy, and pricing workshop.
        Prev Med. 2004; 39: S71-S74
        • Drewnowski A.
        Obesity and the food environment.
        Am J Prev Med. 2004; 27: 154-162

      Biography

      B. J. Rolls is the Guthrie chair and professor of Nutritional Sciences and J. Ledikwe is a postdoctoral fellow at The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, USA

      Biography

      A. Drewnowski is a professor of epidemiology at the University of Washington, Seattle, USA