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A Problem-based Nutrition Care Model That is Diagnostic Driven and Allows for Monitoring and Managing Outcomes

      The American Dietetic Association's (ADA) House of Delegates (HOD) recently identified two important professional issues that have the potential to impact many members. A motion passed at the Spring 2001 HOD meeting identified a need to strengthen members’ ability to interpret research and to conduct and use research in daily practice. The Quality Management Committee and the Research Task Force posed a question in January 2002 to the HOD for dialogue on whether the profession should develop a standardized nutrition care process/model. The HOD will discuss this professional issue further at their Spring 2002 meeting in Chicago in May. These two initiatives provide much of the rationale for this article as well as for two others published within the last year in the Journal. Splett and Myers presented a model that not only described nutrition care as it is commonly delivered in health care, but they also discussed the importance of defining and measuring desired outcomes as an essential part of nutrition care (
      • Splett P.
      • Myers E.
      A proposed model for effective nutrition care.
      ). The nutrition care model presented in Splett and Myers’ article is also intended to act as a starting point for further discussion regarding the development of a standardized model. Kight's model makes a very strong case for the addition of nutritional diagnosis in the nutrition care process. She describes a number of added values for dietetics professionals when they incorporate “nutritional diagnosis” into their nutrition care (
      • Kight M.A.
      Is nutritional diagnosis a critical step in the nutrition care process?.
      ).
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