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Away-from-Home Family Dinner Sources and Associations with Weight Status, Body Composition, and Related Biomarkers of Chronic Disease among Adolescents and Their Parents

      Abstract

      Information regarding associations between types of away-from-home family meal sources and obesity and other chronic diseases could help guide dietetics practitioners. The present study describes the purchase frequency of away-from-home food sources for family dinner (fast food, other restaurant purchases, home delivery, and takeout foods) and associations with weight status and percent body fat among adolescents (n=723) and parents (n=723) and related biomarkers of chronic disease among adolescents (n=367). A cross-sectional study design was used with baseline parent surveys and anthropometry/fasting blood samples from two community-based obesity studies (2006-2008) in Minnesota. Logistic regression and general linear modeling assessed associations between frequency of family dinner sources (weekly vs none in past week) and outcomes (parent and adolescent overweight/obesity and percent body fat; adolescent metabolic risk cluster z score, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, triglycerides, fasting glucose, insulin, and systolic blood pressure. Models accounted for clustering and adjusted for study allocation, baseline meal frequency, and demographic characteristics. The odds of overweight/obesity were considerably greater when families reported at least one away-from-home dinner purchase in the past week (odds ratio=1.2 to 2.6). Mean percent body fat, metabolic risk cluster z scores, and insulin levels were significantly greater with weekly purchases of family dinner from fast-food restaurants (P<0.05). Mean percent body fat, metabolic risk cluster z scores, and high-density lipoprotein levels were significantly higher for families who purchased weekly family dinner from takeout sources (P<0.05). Although frequent family dinners may be beneficial for adolescents, the source of dinners is likely as important in maintaining a healthy weight. Interventions should focus on encouragement of healthful family meals.
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      Biography

      J. A. Fulkerson is an associate professor, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis

      Biography

      M. Y. Kubik is an associate professor, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis

      Biography

      K. Farbakhsh is a senior research fellow, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis

      Biography

      L. Lytle is a professor, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis

      Biography

      M. O. Hearst is a research associate, Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis

      Biography

      D. R. Dengel is an associate professor, School of Kinesiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis

      Biography

      K. E. Pasch is an assistant professor, Department of Kinesiology and Health Education, University of Texas, Austin

      Linked Article

      • Erratum
        Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and DieteticsVol. 112Issue 5
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          The Research and Professional Brief article, “Away-from-Home Family Dinner Sources and Associations with Weight Status, Body Composition, and Related Biomarkers of Chronic Disease among Adolescents and Their Parents,” by Jayne A. Fulkerson, PhD, and colleagues that appeared in the December 2011 issue of the Journal (pages 1892-1897), contains an error on page 1895. The sentence that reads, “Significantly higher mean adolescent metabolic risk cluster z scores (P<0.05) and higher mean HDL-C levels (P<0.05) were also observed when family dinner was purchased at takeout sources at least weekly” is incorrect.
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